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20121214
20121214
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
the 17 you're yo zone nations have agreed to give an additional loan of nearly $45 billion to greece. they say the debt reduction plan is on its way. the loan will be granted as early as next week. at a meeting last month, the euro zone nation ministers agreed in principle on aid for greece after the government carried out austerity and other measures as preconditions for additional loans. at that time they suspended the final decision on loans. they said they needed to determine if greece's bond buy-back program would be effective. at thursday's meeting they endorsed the buy back plan of the depreciated bonds. they will repurchase bonds from the private sector at a third of their face value. the ministers agreed on a separate loan of nearly $20 billion for greece by thend of next march. loans to greece were suspended for the past six months. >> today's decision on the greek package will remove the clouds that are hanging over greece. >> and the greek prime minister welcomed the decision calling it a big success for greece and a big success for europe. investors are still uncertain a
, european finance ministers have said yes to releasing more aid to greece. in a 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens -- >> the 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens. >> there are some who believe it is nothing more than a band-aid. >> emotions spilled over as workers tried to storm a meeting between greek and german officials today are angry over layoffs that are part of broad austerity measures. greeks see the reason to believe next year will be any better. >> they may receive the tranche, but it would be spent in a few months. we will soon be asking for more money. i don't see how that will help the economy. >> one minister remains hopeful, consulting with his counterparts on how to get the economy back on its feet. >> we want to work together to organize a support fund to promote economic growth in greece. >> but that would require attracting private investors. to do that, greece must first settle it unpaid bills. >> of the 9 billion euros that greece still owes, we will pay back everything by 2013 in accordance with the troika deal. >> so, for now, greek
the arts in schools. more than a christmas play is a play. one of my favorite times in school. greece, we did greece in the -- grease, we did greece -- grease in my class. and i was kinicki. >> can you do that? >> i need the wig. >> i played rizzo and i didn't need the wig of the. >> you're welcome. >> patrick, i didn't really understand or agree with your argument, you said something about because joe success was a historical figure. but that has nothing to do with what christmas celebrates. it is celebrating the birth of the son of god. >> but the point is, there is a historically relevant component to that for nonchristians. people who do not claim to be christians or are not christians their eyes will not burn out of their head by watching something that does that. >> jesus in a manger. >> but the entire point of christmas is that jesus is the son of god. it is not that he was a man. >> the point of christmas, jesus the son of god was born that day. >> right, exactly. the son of god. i'm confused. >> you are trying to have a fight about jesus christ. >> i am not having a fight about i
fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small change as the queen and duke of edinburgh were shown the vaults were gold reserves were kept. there are 27 billion pounds of gold in this fault alone. that is not something you see every day, even when you have been doing this sort of thing for 60 years. has the tour went on, talk turned to more serious matters. the queen once asked why nobody had seen the financial crisis coming. officials launched into a three- part lecture on what caused the crisis. the words like "paradigm" flew across the floor. both the duke and the queen listened intently. finally, it became a two-way conversation, and the queen offered a few thoughts of her own. first, a question about the bankers. >> complacency. >> and then a question about the regulator, the
ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s extraordinary renditions programs. it ruled that a german car salesman khaled el-masri was a victim of torture and abuse for four months at the hands of the c.i.a. el-masri said he was kidnapped from macedonia in 2003, interrogated and tortured at an afghan prison run by the c.i.a. and then dropped on an albanian mountainside when authorities realized he posed no threat. macedonia agreed to pay nearly $80,000 in damages. the u.s. has closed internal investigations into the el-masri case. starting today there should be one less reason to reach for the television remote. a new federal law went into effect banning broadcasters from airing commercials at volumes louder than the programming they accompany. the television industry has had one year to adopt the new rules. violations can be reported on the federal communication
of a break-up, notably let by a greece exit were too high, higher than keeping greece in. >> and who were some of the past winners? what in your point of view is the most important criteria for picking person of the year? what is this supposed to represent? >> it's an important contribution to innovation. we've had receive jobs, for example, as person of the year. we earlier, five years ago, we had picked shawn claude trichet, the then president of the european central bank because he led the central bank response in 2001. so i think it's someone who has made a decisive, positive contribution to economic policy, public policy and that is probably why we wouldn't choose the north korean lead, who just let up a north korean missile this week. >> are there any regrets over choosing trichet now? >> i don't think so. he played an important role. we think mr. draghi has been somewhat bolder in his approach, notably through the money transactions which are designed to intervene in the bond market to reduce spreads where, in effect, speculators are betting on a break up of the eurozone, which is
comes up over the year. liz: worried about greece and ireland and portugal, and italy, spain, then the election. go back to the primaries. what will happen with the primaries, then election, then fiscal cliff. it's always something. all you really saw if you look at one are to your charts of the s&p, dow, you name it. not exactly a straight shot, but it was a rally. people sitting on the sidelines terrified, shaking their hands saying we are not going to buy. look at the far left. now where we are today, you're looking at what some of you out there miss because you were scared. how did you convince people there is more room to run normally you don't believe that? >> for us it is very much business. with respect to these various crises are fears of the fiscal cliff for the election are what have you that the rate -- create uncertainties in investors' minds, it's often better to adjust to now. ridge example is the election. in early november right after words two weeks later, 11%, markets is just grew up. be classy about this. event guess what. yesterday or the day before we we
they agreed to give greece now within days 34 billion euros. they've done a deal where the ecb will regulate the biggest banks in europe and, importantly, the germans will be exempted, state run banks, savings banks. so the skeletons can stay in the german closet there as far as the banks are concerned. that was important for the germans. it is ironic in a year when so many people called for a breakup the european union this summit, poland actually said we'd like to start off applications to become the 18th member of the eurozone. that will play out during the course of next year. as far as the stock markets are concerned, today is relatively flat overall. no follow through from china which i mentioned earlier. i thought it was very interesting. here you go. >> the european markets are closing now. >> some are red. some are green. if you check the data you'll see we haven't really moved at all today. china was up 4%. shanghai was up 4% overnight. normally you would expect the australian miners, global miners listed in london to bounce on that. they didn't very much today. and that is partly
yields have come down from 30, as you know, to 12.9%. they are below 13. way to go, greece. they have done very good so far. >> that's interesting, because europe has taken a back seat to many soft other issues. you still worried about europe? should that be part of our investment idea portfolio? >> as david said, that's improved dramatically, too, and it's really taken a back seat, so i would say, as david said, that some type of deal is priced into the market. >> let's do it this way. your single best idea to invest in, and then i'll get yours. >> financials, not necessarily the big banks but bank of new york melon. >> why? >> a processing bank, because it's the cheapest sector. a lot of momentum going for it right now. >> even the low rate that hurt their bottom line because it's tough to lend and borrow at such low rates. >> keep in mind, bank of new york melon, they are a processing bank so lending is not that big a deal to them. >> profit, production and personal income are the three things to watch, the three ps. >> what's your single best? >> our single best idea is apple comp
the lines of what spain did or ireland or greece, cut back our social programs dramatically. we'll have to do what the rest of europe will do over time, which is accept a lower standard of living forever everybody which is why the longer-term plan is so vital, not the short-term craziness. because everybody knows he we can't keep providing americans with the current level of services unless we raise taxes in a big way on erin and cut spending somehow. even the democrats are unwilling to consider that kind of tax cut. that's why long-term spending cuts are so important. they figure into the job creation of the next 25 to 30 years, and the ability of people to stay out of poverty longer term. in the meantime, you can't get the growth needed for government receipts to go higher even in the near term. put simply, if you got someone from honeywell or eaton or celgene in the rule, explain the impact. the imperative would be to get this fiscal cliff done before vacation. hey, listen, yes, no vacation without legislation. because the longer the delay the fewer reasons to start a business and th
. >> gretchen: we look at what is happening in greece where they can not print their own money and they have a massive spending problem. you have rioting in the street. so in a way, in america, since you can print the money, it's just kicking the can down the road, right? >> i think people realize intuitively, this can't work forever. the biggest buyer now of our long-term bonds is the federal reserve. in other words, the government itself is printing money to loan to the government. this can only work for some period of time before the rest of the world says, we no longer trust the u.s. dollar. we don't give it the credibility we used to. >> brian: people outside our windows don't trust the u.s. dollar. that's the scary part. >> people have been excited about the rise in home prices. it's just the long-term, this is not how you grow an economy. this is not how you thrive. >> gretchen: all right. you heard it from james freeman, with the "wall street journal." thanks. >> thanks. >> brian: 19 minutes after the hour. >> gretchen: no love for jesus? a jesus look alike tossed right out of a spor
a year. the equivalent of about $55,000. the current top tax rate in greece is 45% for those earning more than 100,000 euros. finally, business sentiment in europe is slumping in part due to economic uncertainty ahead of this weekend's election. the bank of japan sentiment index dropping to minus 12 from minus 3 in the prior quarter. that was a bigger drop than economists were expecting. mr. kernen? >> all right. getting all these things. so you like he's like bloomberg? no 16 ounce -- >> guy runs -- >> you know. >> no 16 ounce anything over that in sugared drinks. comments, questions about anything you see here on "squawk," e-mail us at squawk @c in.com. you can also follow us on twitter @squawkcnbc. still to come this morning, john mcafee. in the flesh. well he won't be here but on camera. in his first interview since arriving back in the states. an interview you've got to see. plus. have you seen these? want to know how to use them? one of the new ways retailers are hoping to win over consumers. we're going to explain qr codes. the bar code guy died yesterday. can i help you? i heard y
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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